337 Ways to Say Yes and No from 25 Languages
337 Ways to Say Yes and No from 25 Languages

337 Ways to Say Yes and No from 25 Languages

Different languages have different ways of expressing themselves. Native speakers say simple words such as yes and no in radically different ways. Those of us who only speak English often forget how much diversity there is in other languages. Yes can be a simple word in some languages and the list below shows you how to say yes and no in different languages

How to Say No in many languages

Yes in Spanish

  1. Sí: Yes
  2. Claro: Of course
  3. Por supuesto: Certainly
  4. De acuerdo: Agreed
  5. Está bien: OK
  6. Así es: That’s right
  7. Exacto: Exactly
  8. Vale: Alright
  9. Sí, tengo: Yes, I have
  10. Sí, puedo: Yes, I can
  11. Sin problema: No problem
  12. Seguro: Sure
  13. Cierto: True
  14. Desde luego: Of course
  15. Eso es: That’s it
  16. Sí, claro: Yes, of course
  17. Sí, por supuesto: Yes, certainly
  18. Me parece bien: I think it’s good
  19. Estoy de acuerdo: I agree
  20. Okey: Okay

No in Spanish

In Spanish, “No” can be expressed in several ways, depending on the context. Here are some examples:

  1. No – Direct translation of No
  2. Nunca – Never
  3. Nada – Nothing
  4. Ni – Neither/Nor
  5. Jamás – Never (more emphatic than “nunca”)
  6. Ninguno/a – None, not one
  7. Tampoco – Not either

Note that these translations may vary depending on the region and the specific nuances of the conversation. Let’s go to a completely different language: Chinese!

Say Yes in Chinese

The Chinese language is rich and nuanced, and there are many ways to express agreement or affirmation. Here are some examples:

  1. 是 (Shì) – Yes
  2. 对 (Duì) – Correct
  3. 好的 (Hǎo de) – OK
  4. 可以 (Kěyǐ) – Can
  5. 同意 (Tóngyì) – Agree
  6. 当然 (Dāngrán) – Of course
  7. 肯定 (Kěndìng) – Certainly
  8. 没问题 (Méi wèntí) – No problem
  9. 随便 (Suíbiàn) – Whatever
  10. 行 (Xíng) – Okay

Please note that usage can vary depending on the context and regional dialects.

No in Chinese

In Mandarin Chinese, “No” can be expressed in different ways based on the context. Here are some examples:

  1. 不 – Bu, the basic form of No
  2. 不是 – Bú shì, No (in response to a statement)
  3. 没有 – Méi yǒu, No (denying the existence of something)
  4. 别 – Bié, Don’t (imperative form)
  5. 决不 – Jué bù, Never
  6. 一点也不 – Yī diǎn yě bù, Not at all
  7. 不可能 – Bù kě néng, Impossible (can’t be)
  8. 不同意 – Bù tóng yì, Disagree

Like with Spanish, these translations can also vary depending on the region and the specific nuances of the conversation.

Mandarin Chinese differs from Cantonese.

Yes in Cantonese

In Cantonese, expressing affirmation or agreement can take various forms. Here are some examples:

  1. 係 – Hai, the most common way to say Yes
  2. 喺 – Hai, another way to say Yes
  3. 確定 – Kok Ding, to confirm or affirm
  4. 一定 – Yat Ding, Certainly
  5. 當然 – Dong Yun, Of course
  6. 肯定 – Hang Ding, Definitely
  7. 無問題 – Mo Man Tai, No problem

No in Cantonese

In Cantonese, expressing negation or disagreement also takes various forms. Here are some examples:

  1. 唔係 – M Hai, the most common way to say No
  2. 唔喺 – M Hai, another form of No
  3. 唔確定 – M Kok Ding, to show uncertainty or non-affirmation
  4. 唔一定 – M Yat Ding, Not necessarily
  5. 唔當然 – M Dong Yun, Not of course
  6. 唔肯定 – M Hang Ding, Not definitely
  7. 有問題 – Yau Man Tai, There’s a problem

Like in Mandarin, these expressions in Cantonese can vary depending on the speaker’s relationship with the listener, the region, and specific nuances of the conversation.

Say Yes in Korean

The Korean language offers various ways to affirmatively respond or express agreement. Here are a few examples:

  1. 네 (Ne) – Yes
  2. 그래 (Geurae) – Okay
  3. 좋아 (Joah) – Good
  4. 확인 (Hwagin) – Confirm
  5. 동의 (Dongui) – Agree
  6. 물론 (Mullon) – Of course
  7. 분명히 (Bunmyeonghi) – Certainly
  8. 문제 없어 (Munje eobseo) – No problem

Please remember that the usage of these expressions can change based on the context, the speaker’s relationship with the listener, and regional dialects.

No in Korean

In Korean, “No” can be expressed in various ways based on the context. Here are some examples:

  1. 아니요 – Aniyo, Polite form of No
  2. 아니 – Ani, Informal form of No
  3. 안 – An, No (before a verb)
  4. 하지마 – Hajima, Don’t (imperative form)
  5. 없어 – Eopseo, None or not exist
  6. 절대로 – Jeoldaero, Absolutely not/never
  7. 아니라고 – Anirago, Denial in response to a statement
  8. 거절하다 – Geojulhada, to refuse or reject

As with Spanish and Chinese, these translations can also vary depending on the region and the specific nuances of the conversation.

Yes in Japanese

The Japanese language offers different expressions to affirmatively respond or show agreement. Here are a few examples:

  1. はい (Hai) – Yes
  2. うん (Un) – Informal Yes
  3. そうです (Sou desu) – That’s right
  4. 了解 (Ryoukai) – Understood
  5. もちろん (Mochiron) – Of course
  6. 確かに (Tashika ni) – Certainly
  7. 問題ない (Mondai nai) – No problem

Remember, the usage of these expressions can change based on the context, the speaker’s relationship with the listener, and regional dialects.

No in Japanese

In Japanese, “No” can be expressed in various ways based on the context. Here are some examples:

  1. いいえ – Iie, the most common way to say No
  2. ううん – Uun, informal No
  3. ない – Nai, Not (used with a verb)
  4. 無い – Nai, None or doesn’t exist
  5. 絶対にない – Zettai ni nai, Absolutely not/never
  6. 違う – Chigau, No (in response to a statement, implying “that’s not correct/it’s different”)
  7. 嫌だ – Iya da, Don’t want to (refusal)
  8. 拒否する – Kyohi suru, to refuse or reject

Say Yes in Finnish

Finnish despite being in Europe is a completely different language from neighboring languages such as Swedish and Russian because it belongs to a different language family.

  1. Kyllä – Yes, the most common way to say Yes
  2. Joo – Informal Yes
  3. Selvä – Understood
  4. Totta kai – Of course
  5. Ehdottomasti – Absolutely
  6. Aivan – Exactly
  7. Todellakin – Indeed

No in Finnish

In Finnish, “No” can be expressed in various ways based on the context. Here are some examples:

  1. Ei – No, the most common way to say No
  2. Älä – Don’t (imperative form)
  3. Ei ole – Is not/does not exist
  4. Ei koskaan – Never
  5. Ei yhtään – Not at all
  6. Mahdotonta – Impossible (can’t be)
  7. Eri mieltä – Disagree
  8. Kieltäytyä – To refuse or reject

Yes in Yolngu

The Yolngu language, spoken by the Yolngu people of Northern Australia, also has a variety of ways to express affirmation or agreement. Here are some examples:

  1. Ŋarra – Yes (affirmative)
  2. Manymak – Good (affirmative response to a condition or state)
  3. Yaka – Yes (informal)

No in Yolngu language

  1. Yaka – No, the most common way to say No
  2. Waku – Don’t (imperative form)
  3. Yaka dhuwal – Is not/does not exist
  4. Yaka ga dhuwalaŋu – Never
  5. Yaka gurrutu – Not at all
  6. Yaka ŋathi – Impossible (can’t be)
  7. Yaka gurruṯu – Disagree
  8. Waka ga dhuŋgama – To refuse or reject

Yes in Arabic

The Arabic language, spoken widely across the Middle East and North Africa, provides numerous ways to express affirmation or agreement. A few words showing how to say yes:

  1. نعم (Naam) – Yes, the most common way to say Yes
  2. أجل (Ajel) – Indeed, Certainly
  3. طيب (Tayeb) – Okay, Fine
  4. موافق (Mawafeq) – Agree
  5. حسنًا (Hasanan) – Alright, Okay

No in Arabic

In Arabic, “No” can be expressed in various ways based on the context. Here are some examples:

  1. لا – La, No, the most common way to say No
  2. لا تفعل – La taf’al, Don’t (imperative form)
  3. غير موجود – Ghayr mawjood, Does not exist
  4. أبدا – Abadan, Never
  5. ليس على الإطلاق – Lays ‘ala al’iitlaq, Not at all
  6. مستحيل – Mustaheel, Impossible (can’t be)
  7. أعارض – Aearid, Disagree
  8. أرفض – Arfud, To refuse or reject

Yes in Russian

The Russian language, one of the most widely spoken languages in Eastern Europe, has several ways to express affirmation or agreement. Here are some examples:

  1. Да (Da) – Yes, the most common way to say Yes
  2. Конечно (Konechno) – Of course
  3. Согласен (Soglasen) – Agree, masculine form
  4. Согласна (Soglasna) – Agree, feminine form
  5. Хорошо (Khorosho) – Okay, Good
  6. Понял ( Ponyal) – Understood, masculine form
  7. Поняла (Ponyala) – Understood, feminine form

No in Russian

In Russian, “No” can be expressed in various ways based on the context. Here are some examples:

  1. Нет – Nyet, No, the most common way to say No
  2. Не делай – Ne delai, Don’t (imperative form)
  3. Не существует – Ne sushchestvuet, Does not exist
  4. Никогда – Nikogda, Never
  5. Вовсе нет – Vovse net, Not at all
  6. Невозможно – Nevozmozhno, Impossible (can’t be)
  7. Не согласен – Ne soglasen, Disagree
  8. Отказываюсь – Otkazivayus’, To refuse or reject

India is home to hundreds of different languages from many different language families. The languages are so different that going from north to south India makes you feel like you are in a different country. Lets look at how to say yes in Hindi.

Yes in Hindi

Hindi, the official language of India, provides several ways to express affirmation or agreement. Here are some examples:

  1. हाँ (Hāṁ) – Yes, the most common way to say Yes
  2. जी हाँ (Jī hāṁ) – Yes, a more formal way to say Yes
  3. बिलकुल (Bilkul) – Absolutely
  4. सहमत हूँ (Sahamat hūṁ) – I agree
  5. ठीक है (Ṭhīk hai) – Okay, Alright
  6. समझे (Samajhe) – Understood

No in Hindi

In Hindi, “No” can be expressed in various ways based on the context. Here are some examples:

  1. नहीं – Nahi, No, the most common way to say No
  2. मत करो – Mat karo, Don’t (imperative form)
  3. मौजूद नहीं – Maujood nahi, Does not exist
  4. कभी नहीं – Kabhi nahi, Never
  5. बिलकुल नहीं – Bilkul nahi, Not at all
  6. असंभव – Asambhav, Impossible (can’t be)
  7. मैं असहमत हूँ – Main asahmat hoon, Disagree
  8. मैं मना करता हूं – Main mana karta hoon, To refuse or reject

Yes in Bengali

Bengali or Bangla, predominantly spoken in Bangladesh and West Bengal in India,

  1. হ্যাঁ (Hyām̐) – Yes, the most common way to say Yes
  2. অবশ্যই (Obashyei) – Of course
  3. ঠিক আছে (Ṭhik āchē) – Okay, Alright
  4. বুঝেছি (Bujhechi) – Understood
  5. সম্মত (Sammat) – I agree

No in Bengali

In Bengali, there are a variety of phrases to express refusal or disagreement. Here are some examples:

  1. না (Na) – No, the most common way to say No
  2. কিন্তু (Kintu) – But (used to express polite refusal)
  3. অসম্মত (Asammat) – I disagree
  4. বাতিল (Batil) – Null, Invalid (used to express negation)
  5. পরিহার (Parihār) – Reject
  6. অস্বীকার (Osvikar) – Denial
  7. কখনও না (Kokhono na) – Never
  8. বুঝে নাই (Buje nai) – Don’t understand (used to express uncertainty or refusal)

The native language of Greenland and many parts of northern Alaska and Canada is Inuit.

Yes in Inuit

Inuit, a group of culturally similar indigenous peoples inhabiting the Arctic regions, has a unique language known as Inuktitut.

  1. “Ii” – Yes, the most common and direct way of agreeing.
  2. “Aakka” – Indeed, a stronger affirmation.
  3. “Qujannamiik” – Thank you, often used to affirm receipt or understanding.

No in Inuit

In Inuit, “No” can be expressed in various ways based on the context. Here are some examples:

  1. ᐊᔭᙱ – Ajaanngi, No, the most common way to say No
  2. ᐊᔭᙱᓴᕐᓂᖅ – Ajaanngisarniq, Don’t (imperative form)
  3. ᐊᔭᙱᑎᒃᑲᓐᓂᖅ – Ajaanngitikkanniq, Does not exist
  4. ᐊᔭᙱᑐᕆᔭᖅ – Ajaanngiturijaq, Never
  5. ᐊᔭᙱᓴᙱᑦᑐᖅ – Ajaanngisaanngittuq, Not at all
  6. ᐊᔭᙱᑎᒋᖅ – Ajaanngitigiq, Impossible (can’t be)
  7. ᐊᔭᙱᓴᓐᓂᖅ – Ajaanngisarniq, Disagree
  8. ᐊᔭᙱᑐᖅ – Ajaanngituq, To refuse or reject

Let’s go to Navajo which is one of the spoken Native American languages today.

Yes in Navajo

In Navajo, a Native American language, affirmation can be expressed in various ways. Here are some examples:

  1. “Hózhǫ́ǫ́gi” – Yes, the most common and direct way of agreeing.
  2. “Áádóó” – Indeed, a stronger affirmation.
  3. “Ahéhee'” – Thank you, often used to affirm receipt or understanding.
  4. “Hózhǫ́ǫ́gi áádóó” – Yes, indeed, used to strongly affirm a statement or agreement.

No in Navajo

In Navajo, “No” can be expressed in various ways based on the context. Here are some examples:

  1. Tłááʼ – No, the most common way to say No
  2. Hą́ą́gíí – Don’t (imperative form)
  3. Hą́ą́gíí ałhání – Does not exist
  4. Tłáágo – Never
  5. Tłʼígíí – Not at all
  6. Hą́ą́gíí ałhání – Impossible (can’t be)
  7. Hą́ą́gíí ałhání – Disagree
  8. Hą́ą́gíí nidiilkáágíí – To refuse or reject

Yes in Xhosa

In Xhosa, a Bantu language primarily spoken in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa, there are different ways to express affirmation. Here are some examples:

  1. “Ewe” – Yes, the most common and direct way of agreeing.
  2. “Ngoko” – Indeed, a stronger affirmation.
  3. “Kunjalo” – That’s right, often used to affirm a statement.
  4. “Yebo” – Yes, a general affirmation.
  5. “Ndiyavuma” – I agree, used to show agreement with a specific point or statement.
  6. “Ndiyazi” – I know, sometimes used as an affirmation to indicate understanding.

No in Xhosa

In Xhosa, “No” can be expressed in various ways based on the context. Here are some examples:

  1. Hayi – No, the most common way to say No
  2. Musa – Don’t (imperative form)
  3. Akukho – Does not exist
  4. Akukho ndlela – Impossible (can’t be)
  5. Andiyva – Disagree
  6. Andiyi – To refuse or reject

Yes in Amharic

In Amharic, the official language of Ethiopia, there are several ways to express affirmation. Here are some examples:

  1. “Awo” – Yes, the most common and direct way of agreeing.
  2. “Bekil” – Indeed, a stronger affirmation.
  3. “Isshi” – Okay, often used to affirm a statement.
  4. “Yimesgen” – I am grateful, sometimes used as an affirmation to express gratitude.
  5. “Ayzosh” – Alright, a general affirmation.
  6. “Fetari” – I understand, used to display comprehension or agreement with a specific point or statement.

No in Amharic

  1. አይ – Ay, No, the most common way to say No
  2. አትምር – Atimer, Don’t (imperative form)
  3. የለም – Yelem, Does not exist
  4. አልቻልም – Alchalim, Impossible (can’t be)
  5. አልስምም – Alsemmem, Disagree
  6. አልቀበልም – Alkebelim, To refuse or reject

Yes in Tagalog

In Tagalog, the national language of the Philippines, there are several ways to affirmatively respond. Here are some examples:

  1. “Oo” – Yes, the most common way to agree.
  2. “Tama” – Correct, often used to affirm a factual statement.
  3. “Sige” – Okay, used to give consent to a proposition.
  4. “Pwede” – Can/May, sometimes used as an affirmation of permission.
  5. “Ayon” – That’s it, a general affirmation.
  6. “Naiintindihan ko” – I understand, used to show understanding or agreement with a specific point or statement.

No in Tagalog

In Tagalog, “No” can be expressed in various ways based on the context. Here are some examples:

  1. Hindi – No, the most common way to say No
  2. Huwag – Don’t (imperative form)
  3. Wala – Does not exist
  4. Hindi maaari – Impossible (can’t be)
  5. Hindi ako sumasang-ayon – Disagree
  6. Tumanggi – To refuse or reject

Yes in Thai

In Thai, the national language of Thailand, there are several ways to affirmatively respond. Here are some examples:

  1. “Chai” – Yes, this is the most common way to agree.
  2. “Tang” – Correct, often used to affirm a factual statement.
  3. “Dai” – Can, used to give consent to a proposition or to indicate that something is possible.
  4. “Khawp khun” – Thank you, sometimes used as an affirmation to express gratitude.
  5. “Khap” – Male speakers use this term at the end of sentences to be polite and to indicate agreement.
  6. “Kha” – Female speakers use this term at the end of sentences to be polite and to indicate agreement.

No in Thai

In Thai, “No” can be expressed in various ways based on the context. Here are some examples:

  1. ไม่ – Mai, No, the most common way to say No
  2. อย่า – Ya, Don’t (imperative form)
  3. ไม่มี – Mai Mee, Does not exist
  4. ไม่เป็นไปได้ – Mai Pen Pai, Impossible (can’t be)
  5. ฉันไม่เห็นด้วย – Chan Mai Hen Dui, Disagree
  6. ปฏิเสธ – Pati Set, To refuse or reject

Yes in Polish

In Polish, the national language of Poland, there are several ways to affirmatively respond. Here are some examples:

  1. “Tak” – Yes, this is the most common way to agree.
  2. “Dobrze” – Okay, often used to affirm a factual statement.
  3. “Pewnie” – Sure, used to give consent to a proposition or to indicate that something is possible.
  4. “Zgadza się” – That’s right, used to confirm the correctness of a statement.
  5. “Oczywiście” – Of course, used to express strong agreement.
  6. “Zrozumiałem” – I understand, used to show understanding or agreement with a specific point or statement.

No in Polish

In Polish, “No” can be expressed in various ways based on the context. Here are some examples:

  1. Nie – No, the most common way to say No
  2. Nie rób – Don’t (imperative form)
  3. Nie istnieje – Does not exist
  4. Niemożliwe – Impossible (can’t be)
  5. Nie zgadzam się – Disagree
  6. Odmówić – To refuse or reject

Yes in French

In French, the national language of France and many other parts of the world, there are several ways to affirmatively respond. Here are some examples:

  1. “Oui” – Yes, this is the most common way to agree.
  2. “D’accord” – Okay, often used to affirm a factual statement or an action plan.
  3. “Bien sûr” – Of course, used to express strong agreement or certainty.
  4. “C’est vrai” – That’s true, used to confirm the correctness of a statement.
  5. “Je suis d’accord” – I agree, used to show agreement with a statement or plan.
  6. “J’ai compris” – I understand, used to indicate understanding or agreement with a specific point or statement.

No in French

In French, “No” can be expressed in various ways based on the context. Here are some examples:

  1. Non – No, the most common way to say No
  2. Ne faites pas – Don’t (imperative form)
  3. N’existe pas – Does not exist
  4. Impossible – Impossible (can’t be)
  5. Je ne suis pas d’accord – Disagree
  6. Refuser – To refuse or reject

Yes in Portuguese

In Portuguese, the official language of Portugal and Brazil, there are several ways to express agreement or affirmation. Here are some examples:

  1. “Sim” – Yes, the most common way to agree.
  2. “Está bem” – Alright, often used to affirm a factual statement or an action plan.
  3. “Com certeza” – Of course, used to express strong agreement or certainty about something.
  4. “É verdade” – That’s true, used to confirm the correctness of a statement.
  5. “Concordo” – I agree, used to show agreement with a statement or plan.
  6. “Entendi” – I understand, used to indicate understanding or agreement with a specific point or statement.

No in Portuguese

In Portuguese, “No” can be expressed in various ways based on the context. Here are some examples:

  1. Não – No, the most common way to say No
  2. Não faça – Don’t (imperative form)
  3. Não existe – Does not exist
  4. Impossível – Impossible (can’t be)
  5. Eu não concordo – Disagree
  6. Recusar – To refuse or reject

Yes in German

In German, the official language of Germany, Austria, and parts of Switzerland, there are numerous ways to express agreement or affirmation. Here are some examples:

  1. “Ja” – Yes, the most common way to agree.
  2. “In Ordnung” – Alright, often used to affirm a factual statement or an action plan.
  3. “Natürlich” – Of course, used to express strong agreement or certainty about something.
  4. “Das stimmt” – That’s true, used to confirm the correctness of a statement.
  5. “Ich stimme zu” – I agree, used to show agreement with a statement or plan.
  6. “Ich verstehe” – I understand, used to indicate understanding or agreement with a specific point or statement.

No in German

In German, “No” can be expressed in various ways based on the context. Here are some examples:

  1. Nein – No, the most common way to say No
  2. Nicht – Not
  3. Tu das nicht – Don’t (imperative form)
  4. Existiert nicht – Does not exist
  5. Unmöglich – Impossible (can’t be)
  6. Ich bin nicht einverstanden – Disagree
  7. Ablehnen – To refuse or reject

Yes in Vietnamese

In Vietnamese, the official language of Vietnam, there are numerous ways to express agreement or affirmation. Here are some examples:

  1. “Có” – Yes, the most common way to agree.
  2. “Đồng ý” – Agree, used to show agreement with a statement or plan.
  3. “Tất nhiên” – Of course, used to express strong agreement or certainty about something.
  4. “Đúng” – Correct, used to confirm the correctness of a statement.
  5. “Hiểu” – Understand, used to indicate understanding or agreement with a specific point or statement.
  6. “Được” – Okay, often used to affirm a factual statement or an action plan.

No in Vietnamese

In Vietnamese, “No” can be expressed in various ways based on the context. Here are some examples:

  1. Không – No, the most common way to say No
  2. Đừng – Don’t (imperative form)
  3. Không tồn tại – Does not exist
  4. Không thể – Impossible (can’t be)
  5. Tôi không đồng ý – Disagree
  6. Từ chối – To refuse or reject

Yes in Swahili

In Swahili, the official language of multiple countries in East Africa, there are several ways to express agreement or affirmation. Here are some examples:

  1. “Ndiyo” – Yes, the most common way to agree.
  2. “Sawa” – Okay, often used to agree with a plan or idea.
  3. “Kweli” – True, used to confirm the truthfulness of a statement.
  4. “Afadhali” – Preferably, used when preferring one option over another.
  5. “Nakubaliana” – I agree, used to show agreement with a statement or plan.

No in Swahili

In Swahili, “No” can be expressed in various ways based on the context. Here are some examples:

  1. Hapana – No, the most common way to say No
  2. Usifanye – Don’t (imperative form)
  3. Haipo – Does not exist
  4. Haiwezekani – Impossible (can’t be)
  5. Sikubaliani – Disagree
  6. Kukataa – To refuse or reject

Yes in Turkish

In Turkish, which is the spoken language in Turkey and Northern Cyprus, there are several ways to express agreement or affirmation. Here are some examples:

  1. “Evet” – Yes, the most common way to agree.
  2. “Tamam” – Okay, often used to agree with a plan or idea.
  3. “Doğru” – True, used to confirm the truthfulness of a statement.
  4. “Kabul ediyorum” – I agree, used when agreeing with a statement or plan.
  5. “Anladım” – I understand, used to indicate understanding of a point or concept.
  6. “Olur” – Alright, often used as an affirmative response to a suggestion or proposal.

No in Turkish

In Turkish, “No” can be expressed in various ways based on the context. Here are some examples:

  1. Hayır – No, the most common way to say No
  2. Yapma – Don’t (imperative form)
  3. Var olmayan – Does not exist
  4. Imkansız – Impossible (can’t be)
  5. Katılmıyorum – Disagree
  6. Reddetmek – To refuse or reject

Yes in Greek

Greek is spoken in Greece and Cyprus.

  1. “Ναι” (Nai) – Yes, the most common way to agree.
  2. “Εντάξει” (Entáxei) – Okay, often used to agree with a plan or idea.
  3. “Αληθινό” (Alithinó) – True, used to confirm the truthfulness of a statement.
  4. “Συμφωνώ” (Symfonó) – I agree, used when agreeing with a statement or plan.
  5. “Καταλαβαίνω” (Katalavainó) – I understand, used to indicate understanding of a point or concept.

No in Greek

  1. Όχι (Ochi) – No, the most common way to say No
  2. Μην (Min) – Don’t (imperative form)
  3. Δεν υπάρχει (Den uparxei) – Does not exist
  4. Αδύνατο (Adynato) – Impossible (can’t be)
  5. Διαφωνώ (Diafono) – Disagree
  6. Αρνούμαι (Arnoumai) – To refuse or reject

As with Spanish, Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Finnish, Australian Aboriginal languages, Arabic, Russian, Hindi, Inuit, Navajo, Xhosa, Amharic, Tagalog, Thai, Polish, French, Portuguese, German, Vietnamese, Swahili, and Turkish, these translations in Greek can also vary depending on the region and the specific nuances of the conversation.

Now you know how to say no in many languauges. The eight most spoken language usually get the most attention but it is important to give attention to other languages as well. Different languages say no and yes in different ways.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *